• Citizens Afield
    Citizen science allows us not only to contribute to research, but also to connect more deeply with nature.
    By Lucy Bryan
  • Recovery Roadblocks
    The Mexican gray wolf’s return to the Southwest has been sluggish due to decades of flawed conservation efforts.
    By John Soltes
  • March of the Armyworm
    A new invasive pest is damaging crops at an alarming rate as it moves across Africa.
    By Stephanie Parker
  •  

Latest News

For Baby Sea Turtles, Beaches Are Becoming Safer But Ocean Threats Persist

Researchers struggle to assess impacts of undersea hazards like plastic pollution and overfishing

On beaches from North Carolina to Texas and throughout the wider Caribbean, one of nature’s great seasonal events is underway. Adult female sea turtles are crawling out of the ocean, digging deep holes in the sand and laying eggs. After about 60…
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For Flint Mother, There’s No Stopping Until All US Kids Have Safe Drinking Water

“I don’t want other families to go through what we went through,” says LeeAnne Walters

Until her then three-year-old twin boys began to break out in rashes in 2014 and both she and her daughter had clumps of hair falling out in the shower, LeeAnne Walters hadn’t spent much time worrying about enviornmental pollution. “I mean, I…
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Could Sprinkling Sand Save the Arctic’s Shrinking Sea Ice?

Pilot project at northern Alaska lake is one of many aiming to slow climate change with geoengineering, and raising concerns about unintended consequences

As a test location for a project that aims to ensure the livability of Earth, a frozen lake near the northern tip of Alaska could seem rather inauspicious. Photo by Andrew PetersenSea ice near Utqiaġvik, Alaska. Researchers will be sprinking tiny spheres…
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Putting Her Life on the Line to Save a River from Illegal Gold Mining

Goldman Prize winner Francia Márquez’s has been involved in a long struggle to protect the Ovejas River and her Afro-Colombian community

Francia Márquez, 36, grew up in La Toma, an isolated town nestled in western Colombia’s verdant Cuaca Mountains. Established in the early 1600s by escaped slaves, the Afro-Colombian community sits along the Ovejas River and residents depend on the river’s water and…
> Read more

Rewild Your Child. The Earth Depends On It.

Yes, we need to let our kids muck around in the mud, but we also need to somehow allow nature to seep inside them

This article originally appeared in JSTOR Daily. Imagine 20 million Americans taking to the streets, rallying in parks and congregating in theaters, schools and universities to protest our treatment of the planet. It’s hard now to picture this, but on April 22,…
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30 percent of Great Barrier Reef Coral Died in ‘Catastrophic’ 2016 Heatwave

Extent and severity of 'mass mortality' event documented in report has shocked scientists

Scientists have chronicled the “mass mortality” of corals on the Great Barrier Reef, in a new report that says 30 percent of the reef’s corals died in a catastrophic nine-month marine heatwave. Photo by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/Mia…
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Voices

Ralph Nader
The ever-energetic octogenarian activist talks politics, environment, and why pessimism should never be part of a civic personality.
> Read more
Stacy Martin
The creator of MooPoo Ranch in Junction City, Wisconsin explains what led her move from Big Diary to small-scale food production where the animals are raised in alignment with nature.
> Read more

Current Issue

thumbnail of the cover of the Earth Island Journal

Leave No Worker Behind

Will the just transition movement survive mainstream adoption?
By Samantha M. Harvey

Learning from Death

Roadkill can help us understand more about creatures great and small.
By Eric Freedman

Big Soda’s Sneaky Tactic Undermining Democracy

Faced with mounting pushback against sugar-sweetened beverages, Big Soda is turning to preemption bills to thwart community organizing.
By Anna Lappé

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